See all reviews of Uncanny X-Force (4)

Marvel NOW! continues to introduce new #1 issues. This time Uncanny X-Force is back, although it was only good for a month or so. It’s clear this is a new team aside from Psylocke and Fantomex although they are both very much changed. A new direction, a new purpose and a new roster; sounds like a good start, but as far as this issue, is it good?


Uncanny X-Force Vol. 2 #1 (Marvel Comics)


Considering how popular the Rick Remender-written Uncanny X-Force was, writer Sam Humphries has large shoes to fill. It’s good that Remender put to bed most of the storylines in this series, but also leaving Psylocke and Fantomex in very different places than they were most of the series. This allows Humphries to change not only carry on the story, but do something completely different. Fantomex was split into three physical identities, one of which is female and another evil, which should allow for new and interesting stories. Psylocke on the other hand is burned out from her exploits in the series prior. Because of this, the fact that she’s clearly headlining this series, at least to start, is a good thing.


Steampunk makes an appearance.

There’s a good balance of character and action as it progresses here. While there isn’t much fighting going on until later in the book, the characters are at least doing something. So often we see comics where characters stand around talking for five pages, then nonstop action for another five, then back to talking. There isn’t a panel where the comic appears to be treading water.


He’s one to talk! Wolverine is always endangering students and never present in his world trotting adventures.


This hurts my eyes.

As far as a first issue of a team book there’s a nice balance between the team coming together and the characters’ headspace. Puck, Storm, Fantomex, and though it’s only a page, Bishop get an adequate amount page-time to let the reader know where they stand. The fact that there isn’t a hero scouring for heroes to join the team is a breath of fresh air as well. The fact that Psylocke wants nothing to do with a team shows, at least as first story arcs go, that this is going to be a reluctant hero being called to action. Something we don’t see enough of these days.


Female versions of heroes are always so hot!


Storm’s divorce was reported on NPR. Rad.

Of course it’s not just about the characters and they do actually do something in this issue. It seems there’s some kind of new drug that appears to be creating a hive mind. The fact that it might be connected to a mutant? Pretty cool idea.


We’re already taking this drug. It’s called American Idol.

It also has something to do with Spiral, of all villains, and it’s nice to see a villain we don’t see every day make an appearance. That said, the cover seems to suggest she’ll become a member of the team. Seeing her pop up actually reminded me how long it’s been since a new character was created over at Marvel. If they aren’t from the first few decades of Marvel’s creation, they’re from the 80′s it seems. Time for more creativity, eh?

There isn’t a whole lot of action, with most of the pages spent on character and plot, but when it does arrive it’s a whole lot of fun. It’s easy to forget Psylocke is a full fledged ninja.


Love the colors.

Final Score: 9

  • Good character development
  • A fitting next chapter in the story
  • The last page is kind of repulsive

And to think I didn’t even mention Ron Garney’s really well laid out pages. His work is very clean and interesting to look at, especially when characters are simply talking.

Is It Good?

Yep. Each character is interesting and under duress and the twist at the end will make you hurl and cheer all at the same time.