See all reviews of Secret Avengers (3)

For a series titled Secret Avengers there hasn’t been that much secret about it. Sure, the team is covert, but the super secret spy stuff you might see in a show like Alias comes few and far between. Essentially it’s been a version of Avengers that take on operations that aren’t so clean. This new Marvel NOW! iteration, though, appears to be rewriting what it means to be a secret Avenger. A change of the status quo in Avengers comics; is it good?


Secret Avengers Vol. 2 #1 (Marvel Comics)


Let me be very clear when I say this: do not flip through this comic and expect to be enthralled. This is a comic that must be read from beginning to end in one sitting. I don’t want to spoil anything, but if you’re familiar with spy films you’re going to want to ride this one out. The enjoyment in reading this comic doesn’t hit you in the teeth, but rather like good dentistry you’ll feel it a few hours later when you thought the pain was over.


New creepy villain is super creepy!

As of this issue the team consists of Nick Fury (the black one), Black Widow, Agent Hill and Hawkeye. It opens with Hawkeye on a mission, then cuts to a hours earlier when he and Widow were asked to join. Phil Coulson from Marvel movie fame recruits them with just one condition and that is that they can know their mission for a brief time. Then it’s zapped out of their heads with nanites. He gets them to agree by telling them some juicy stuff, although the comic witholds said info.


Coulson comes off as kind of evil here.

So the premise makes this the most secret of Secret Avengers we’ve ever known. Not even the heroes know the secrets due to this nanite fix. Sure, it’s a bit wrong in some ways, but it actually creates a new layer of espionage that superhero books have been lacking.


Still the same boobage.


Seriously, this Fury change simply to connect it to the films is a bit much.

Another intriguing aspect to this new series is this new Fury. For those of you catching up Agent Fury is the son of the original Nick Fury…and he named his black son Nick Fury. He popped up out of nowhere last year and it’s an obvious move by Marvel to connect the films to the comics. As long as they write him well I’m fine with this. In actuality his presence in this issue is one of the best parts, especially his discussion of James Bond with Hawkeye.


Hmm, interesting point.

There’s no telling if superheroes are going to join this team or not, but my best guess is they should leave them out of it. Agent Hill makes a good point about laserboobs here:


“Beams out of their nipples”…Where is this hero?!

Another reason to leave them out, at least for a little while, is because good espionage can’t really exist when there are superheroes who can chop right through the hiding and sneaking. Why do any intel work when you can send a Hulk to kill everybody?


Interesting bad guy plans.

Final Score: 9

  • A rewarding read if you give it a chance
  • A couple interesting gadgets for the Bond lovers
  • You’re going to need a little patience to get to the payoff

Let’s face it, writer Nick Spencer has delivered a fresh take on a team book that’s been more of the same for too long. Artist Luke Ross delivers a dark and shady book that has some Steve Epting flare but dare I say better flow. If Spencer can continue surprising me I’ll be reading this to the day he gets shifted off the book.

Is It Good?

Oh yes. When something comes along that can surprise you in a good way, should not pass it up.

  • PatchesOHoulihan

    So Nick Fury’s son was born with an inherent lack of eyeball?