See all reviews of B.P.R.D. Vampire (5)

Mike Mignola, Fabio Moon, and Gabriel Ba on the written, Fabio and Gabriel on the drawn. Back to B.P.R.D. Vampire, and Agent Sam Eagle. Vampiyahs!


B.P.R.D. Vampire #3 (Dark Horse Comics)


Moon and Ba have a way of making their writing and art as fluid as a spilled glass of water on a tilted waterbed. This issue proves this yet again, as we follow Agent Anders on his quest to kick some vampire ass. We have beautiful panels, with grimy cave backdrops. All while people fly, or fall, through the panels.

This is perhaps the greatest strength of artist written comics. The same strength to be found in director written films, though comics are far from anything like films (so don’t write me angry letters, Alan Moore. By the way, I was wondering how long you’ve been growing out your wizard beard. I was hoping to grow one when I retire, and I want to know roughly how many years before retirement I should start… Oh right, the review!) Ehem, uh, but yes, Fabio Moon and Gabriel Ba have a remarkable ability of making the panels move organically. And this is mere speculation, having never worked on a comic before. I just hypothesize it’d be faster, or easier, to go from a comic script to a panel if you were the one that wrote the idea for the panel in the first place.

I am going to stop even mentioning my weird distaste of large noses in comic art (after this instance, o’ course), so just assume from now on if there’s a large nose for what I feel is no reason, I’ll probably be an asshole and say it was a negative contribution to the art of the comic. I was raped by a large nose when I was in high school; I’d rather not have to recount the snotty details. Although I will say it was odd that a giant nose with arms and legs was even permitted to attendmy high school.

There is a bit of a twist if you haven’t read the other two issues, but otherwise it’s not a twist at all. It’s still cool to see Agent Anders go vampire, and get some glowing red eyes. The plot is really quite good, and even spans back a ways in the B.P.R.D. series. So, stuff for people that have been reading religiously, but not so hard you can’t go back to issue one and pick up what’s going on. Hell, you don’t even need to start with one. Just Google what’s going on. Still, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention the plot is in fact more complex than vampires fighting each other in a cave, and sweeps this and another arc. The historical aspects of the plot are quite intriguing.

9.0

  • Great vampire action!
  • Plot is engaging, filled with history, and sweeping
  • Takes place in a cave for most of it! Brutal
  • I’m an asshole…but the noses.

Is It Good?

Yep, it’s good. The action is frenetic, the art is good, cartoony, and stylized. There’s some great vampire action missing from the last two issues. And most of the issue takes place in a cave, so that rules. Another added bonus is since it’s mainly fighting, you don’t even really have to remember the backstory to appreciate the issue. I know I sure didn’t, until I went back and re-read my first review. Don’t you judge me! I read a lot of comics! And take a lot of Xanax.

You like ya vampiyahs, go read the comic. It’s a very classical vampire tale, set in old Europe? I mean, yes, set in old Europe! Czechoslovakia! (I forgot last review as well, hence why I didn’t mention it until the last paragraph, much like in this one.) Yes, to get the full scale, you should probably start with issue one. But, again, if you don’t have the time or funds, a simple Google search will easily suffice.