See all reviews of Age of Ultron (11)

Marvel Comics’ spring event is over…or is it? Age of Ultron reaches its 10th and final issue today, but many folks who don’t follow solicits and previews are going to be in for a surprise. This series has been one long frustration waiting to end, but heck, maybe the final issue sings. Is it good?


Age of Ultron #10 (of 10) (Marvel Comics)



Check out our reviews of issue #9 and issue #8 if you missed them.

Let me sum up the nine issues—that’s $35.91 cents of savings so you better appreciate it—in a single sentence: The world was taken over by Ultron so Wolverine and Sue Storm went back in time twice (with lots and lots of stupid time travel brouhaha) and told Hank Pym that he needed to install a failsafe into Ultron to stop his world takeover. This issue takes place a few months before said takeover and we finally get to see Ultron! That’s right, he makes his first appearance in the last issue of a series named after him! Joy!


Yeah, because any number of villains couldn’t trick him with an iPad video?

For some reason it appears Angela is more anticipated in this issue than an actual ending, but maybe that’s because we all knew that this was all going to tie into Marvel’s summer event. But I’m getting ahead of myself here. This issue concludes with a very time travelly solution to this very time travelly series. In that sense then, at least it’s playing by its own rules. Probably the only surprise in this issue is that it’s not surprising how Ultron is ultimately defeated. Last issue spelled it out for us: Pym creates a code inside Ultron to stop him in the future, and while it’s a bit boring to watch something unfold as you expected, it at least looks great.


That’s not the Avengers I grew up with! Damn you Bendis!

This issue is drawn by 10, count them, 10 artists, which is kind of perplexing. Bryan Hitch makes a return to draw Ultron’s demise, but is quickly changed out for someone else. It’s possible this switch is due to his leaving the project as it’s widely known this series was drawn and written over a year ago. Then to fix it to meet Marvel’s current plans new artists came in and did their work. Alex Maleev and Joe Quesada draw a few pages as well, although they do more of a tacked-on job at the end to feature an Ultimate universe development and Angela.


Finally!

It’s no surprise most readers are going to breathe a sigh of relief when Ultron finally shows up. It’s not the best battle in the world (it only lasts eight pages), but it’s interesting to watch Ultron deal with what he thinks is a virus. Wolverine and Sue Storm, the ones who have been doing all the time hopping, make a brief appearance and then seemingly get destroyed by the space time continuum. I want to think they matter, but this turn of events suggested their entire purpose in this series was to fulfill a plot development and nothing more.


Check it out! Spider-Man 2099! Radical! Also, anyone get a DC vibe from this? Looks like a Crisis of Infinity Plus 1 Earths.

Which brings up the ultimate question. Does this comic matter? It’s hard not to review it and get into all the things that happen at the end, because that’s really why this comic will be bought and read in the first place. We as of yet still haven’t been told when this actually happens…but I suppose it could have happened in an alternate universe? The final few pages suggest then, that because of the actions of a non 616 universe group of heroes, the 616 is being changed. Kind of an odd thing for Marvel to do. Have the actions of non-canon characters affecting their entire universe, but hey, maybe at the end of the next event we’ll get some answers. For once.


Finally she arrives, what nobody asked for!

7.0

  • Lots of good pictures to look at
  • How Ultron is taken down is entertaining
  • Kind of a non-ending

For a series that’s been filled with a lot of filler (literally pages upon pages of rubble) this ending probably couldn’t have been any better. In a lot of ways it’s obvious this series was shoehorned in just so that all that art wasn’t lost and a way to get Marvel to tell the real event they’ve been building towards. The heroes win, but they do it at the cost of yet another event for the readers to sift through. It doesn’t help that you can boil down this entire series into a sentence or two either.

Overall this series was a failure because it went on way too long and didn’t say nearly enough. As far as conclusions go though, there’s hope at the end of this laborious tunnel, which is saying a lot when the journey felt so hopeless.

Is It Good?

Decent enough. If you want to sneak a peak into the next event check out the last few pages, but overall a predictable ending that’s better than most of the issues preceding it.

  • Bibblemeister

    I thought this issue and the series was underwhelming overall. The character development that did happen was pretty fleeting and was ultimately negated by the ending.

    The story seemed more interested in skipping from point A to point B and so on rather than developing characters past fleeting moments. The whole go back in time to influence a specific event, but have a certain person forget such foreknowledge until it’s convenient just reads like an example of the more hokey of comic book plot devices.

    In short AoU (any issue or overall) is fairly forgettable and meaningless and worth skipping. By no means an example of great comic book storytelling.

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