See all reviews of Age of Ultron (11)

Hank Pym is a tricky character. Read any comments section in regards to the Ant-Man movie and you’ll see a plethora of negativity towards the character. “What a dumb power” and “how would that even work?” Well I have news for you gentle readers Marvel Comics has released an Age of Ultron tie in this week that should by any and all Hank Pym haters. You can probably guess already what I think, but is it good?


Age of Ultron #10AI (Marvel Comics)



If you missed our review of Age of Ultron #10 click here.

This issue is a first person narrative taking place just after the Age of Ultron #10. Hank Pym has saved the day and that weird combining of realities has taken place. Instead of telling us what he does next this issue focuses on who he is and why he’s the most schizophrenic of superheroes. Writer Mark Waid recaptures why this character is so unique and interesting perfectly and in its concluding pages gives us a look at why his powers are so damn cool too.


What a goof.

If you know anything about Hank Pym, it’s that there really isn’t a hero who has changed as much as him over the years. He went from Ant-Man, to Giant-Man, to Goliath to Yellowjacket. He’s been a wife beater, a villain and a complete crazy which makes you wonder, was he poorly written or did Marvel have no idea what to do with him? Those questions don’t really matter because this issue does an amazing job explaining why he’s changed so much. Waid introduces (or maybe this is canon i’m not sure) a relative who was a science fiction writer. Pym was born a genius, but with her creative spirit Pym became an imaginative scientist. This detail helps set him apart from the other scientists in the Marvel Universe and gives him a fun spin that really isn’t utilized enough.


Ant-Man powers straight to Giant-Man powers. Nice!

Another surprising thing about this issue is how heavy handed the first person narration is and yet it reads so well. Waid’s writing is easy to read, but also interesting. So often this much narration can become stifling and boring, but not so here.


How do you explain to your girlfriend this is how you got AIDS?

Andre Araujo art is good and there are some flashes of greatness too. There are moments where his pencils look a bit cartoony, but others where I could swear Gary Frank drew them. Judging by how strong this issue is we should all keep an eye on this artist as he’s going to be one of the greats in years to come.


Aint that cute.

9.0

  • Hank Pym has never looked so good
  • It’ll make you believer in the character so many people loathe and don’t understand
  • First person narrative heavy which might turn some readers off, especially the impatient ones

This issue can easily be read by anyone without knowledge of the character or even the Age of Ultron event. It’s just that good. The art is incredible too, and while there’s a panel or two that’s questionable, it tells the story well. It also ends, but also gives readers a bit of an epilogue to wet their anticipatory appetites. From cover to cover this is a great read.

Is It Good?

Yes. If only more single issues were this strong with no decompression or requirements to read 6 issues to understand.

About The Author

David Brooke
Contributor, Comics Manager

David used to write for his movie site Cine Discretion whilst writing a movie review column in college as well as a short stint writing for the Cape Codder newspaper. When the paper business went under David vowed to find a job in video and now currently works at a software company. Paper was overrated. Staving off insanity, David directed, wrote and starred in a bunch of short films. Dave currently creates training videos using sparkly animations but one of his true loves is writing about movies, comics, books and other nerd debauchery.