See all reviews of The Green Hornet (3)

Mark Waid is burning it up with The Green Hornet lately and we got a fresh issue this week to see how high that flame can get. Is it good?


Mark Waid’s The Green Hornet #7 (Dynamite Entertainment)



Missed our review of issue #6? Read it here.

Last month we finally got to see Kato and Green Hornet team up in their semi-villainous endeavors. You see, they’ve decided to work on the wrong side of the law, but only to get closer to the top of the villain chain. This means pretending to be bad guys to convince the gangs they are legit. This issue expands on that as Green Hornet and Kato decide they need to get bigger to sustain their detective work.


Recap page done right.

Mark Waid continues to write clearly with consistent additions to keep the read interesting. This issue adds a new member to the team, the opening of a radio station and a huge reveal of where the bad guy Hornet has been after for the last few issues now. The issue does bog down a bit with dialogue, as there aren’t so many things for the characters to do, but more for them to plot and plan. That said, the developments are interesting enough to keep you turning the pages with anticipation.


Bling bling!

Artist Ronilson Freire continues to do good work, especially with the layouts. I’m starting to notice some panels seem to be referencing classic films—in this issue the bad guy and how he holds a firing gun—which is a nice touch that adds a subliminal level of the older setting. Clearly one of his strengths is faces, and he gets to show off his work on a few panels that’ll visualy blow your mind. And it’s a just a face!


Scary superhero work there, Hornet.

8.5

  • Interesting developments that’ll keep your story-starved brain sated
  • Great layouts
  • Little dialogue heavy with not much action

Is It Good?

This is a very good crime comic with superhero undertones. Obviously Hornet isn’t super, but Mark Waid is setting up a superhero team that’s interesting and fresh. That’s saying a lot when you consider how repetitive most hero books are these days.