See all reviews of Edge of Spider-Verse (4)

So far, Spider-Verse has been a fun little anthology series where we get to read about alternate dimension Spider-Man characters. It’s basically an origin story series building up on characters I assume will become a bigger part of the crossover Marvel is working on. Last week we got a killer Gwen Stacy Spider-Woman issue and this week it’s a techno-manga-looking Spider-Man. Is it good?


Edge of Spider-Verse #3 (Marvel Comics)


This may be the coolest comic to hit the stands this week, so Spider-Man fans and everyone else alike take note. The concept behind this Spider-Man isn’t completely new. What we have is a guy who’s a super smart scientist and actually works out the way to splice his DNA with spider DNA to give him some of the powers of Spider-Man. Considering how many heroes try to do this and fail, like the Hulk for example, this shows his smarts. He also builds a really cool suit that allows him to jump far distances, monitor crime through a cool mask and shoot webs.


Where does he get all these wonderful toys?

Writer Dustin Weaver writes a pretty solid script that’s well paced and interesting. There’s a lot of exposition up front, which usually knocks a book’s grade a bit for me, but he does something spectacular and inventive. To introduce the two villains in this issue he uses the front and back of a Marvel card. We get their power levels, bio and even a “Did You Know” as well. It’s a really fun way to get a lot of information out to the reader. I’m not sure if it breaks the fourth wall or not though as the physical Marvel Card doesn’t seem to be a thing in this universe. I guess it’s just a method to tell us, as the writer, more about the characters.

The character is also quite interesting, mostly because of his unique relationship to a woman whose child was hit by a car. She’s his boss and becomes his lover, but the complexity of the situation between her and her child makes his involvement all the more interesting. Given, we don’t get a lot of time with this Spider-Man, but it’s interesting nonetheless.

On top of all that I love Weaver’s design of the Spider-Man costume and the mechanics. He takes you inside the costume to see how it works and whenever he speaks with the helmet on there’s a cool see through effect he uses that’s interesting. In a way some of his panels are like car porn. He gives you close ups of the very sleek and shiny aspects of the suit which are very nice indeed.


Marvel Cards as storytelling element!

Is It Good?

The best Spider-Verse issue yet with an interesting Spider-Man origin and costume. Heck, even the issue has a conclusion, which the first two did not have, and adds to the overall event too!

Is It Good? Edge of Spider-Verse #3 Review
Awesome costume designCool Marvel Card storytelling ideaInteresting origin and conclusion too!
Some panels are a bit stuffed with exposition early on
10Overall Score
Reader Rating 6 Votes
7.6
  • Mark Pellegrini

    That gimmick with the 1990 Marvel Trading Card fact file is fantastic.

    • GinkyAnderson

      The Win Percentage was one of my favorite stats as a kid. “Oh yeah, well Silver Surfer could beat Wolverine because Surfer’s win percentage is 82%! Suck it, Logan!”

      • David Brooke

        It’s the only way to really know who beats who!

        • GinkyAnderson

          The people who had to track all those wins and losses — where are they now? And did they get a raise? Because they sure as hell deserved one.

          • Russ Dobler

            I’m sure it was just made up. No one ever had a losing record!

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  • winaiden

    This comic was nowhere close to a 10, are you kidding me? Specifically when compared to the Gwen Stacy issue. (That was scored lower by you.) Absurd. To each his own and all that, but f**k me. Get it together, dude. That’s shameful.

    • Russ Dobler

      Haha, that’s pretty harsh, but yeah, I hated this one. My least favorite by far. Love Weaver’s art, but his idea of telling a story is apparently an exposition dump with a few crumbs of dialogue. 🙁