See all reviews of Ivar, Timewalker (4)

To prove the theory that time travelers cannot change history, Ivar and Neela have traveled back to 1940’s Germany to a Nazi bunker in attempts to kill, or rather not kill, Hitler. However, with their time traveling device stolen and both Ivar and Neela taken prisoner by Nazis, will the duo be stuck in the mid twentieth century forever? Is it good?


Ivar, Timewalker #3 (Valiant Entertainment)


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So when we left off, Neela was about to be interrogated when a familiar face shows up, one belonging to the British officer she saw on earlier traveling escapades. The stranger explains his name is Gilad Anni-Padda, which should sound familiar because it’s Ivar’s last name, making this man just one of his multiple brothers. While he cannot time travel, he does possess the ability to live eternally as different soldiers throughout time. Gilad talks with Neela, but then the two go separate ways, leaving Neela with the task of saving Ivar herself. In a dramatic and character developing fashion, the two are reunited briefly before Neela is then tasked with finding the compass and there way out of the era.

The rest of the issue involves a cameo by Adolf himself, another time hopping trip, and another visit from the Promethians, who get in a few words in with Neela that results in the growing uncertainty that Ivar isn’t exactly who he claims to be. If you haven’t read issue two since last month you may want to revisit it right before because this issue makes several references to events from the last issue. Despite the same amount of pages, this issue also feels like a much shorter read than the last couple comics.

As plot thickens, the comic has grown significantly more complex which has its pros and cons. On one hand, its ability to create a fairly simple and succinct storyline is now lost and will surely have more readers scratching their heads at what just happened. The Promethian’s origin and mode of transportation is still bizarre to me and Hawking’s Chronological Protection Theory is something for readers to attempt to wrap their heads around. On top of that, there’s the ever present debate of whether Ivar is good or not. However, that’s the mystery aspect I thoroughly enjoy so far. I couldn’t imagine the comic’s title character being the villain after posing as the alluring and heroic figure through the first few issues, but at this point there’s more evidence stacking against him than for him, especially after this next issue.

The art is definitely top notch and is currently one of my favorites of any series I’m reading currently. There is always plenty of emotion in the character’s faces and every issue is aesthetically pleasing when it comes to the color scheme and the amount of variety included. The writing is also very good, some of Gilad’s were notably profound and I went back to read them over several times.

Is It Good?

Ivar, Timewalker #3 is the first time the series comes down from its debut high. While it still proves to be an extremely promising series, constantly engaging, and features quality art and writing, it’s downfall comes at the hands of an growing complexity of the storyline. Jeff Daniels had a line in the movie Looper that went “All this time travel shit, just fries your brain like an egg.” Let’s hope Ivar, Timewalker doesn’t continue on that current trajectory.

Is It Good? Ivar, Timewalker #3 Review
Great art and notably good writingPlenty of plot twists
The plot is getting a bit too congested with mystery and time travel confusion
7.5Overall Score
Reader Rating 1 Vote
7.5