See all reviews of Rasputin (9)

This is the penultimate issue of sorts, with big reveals taking place over this issue to be concluded in issue #10. Given this series tends to take a slower pace a lot can’t be revealed just right here, can it? Most importantly…is it good?

Rasputin #9 (Image Comics)

Rasputin aka the Mad Monk has the ability to bring those who have died back to life. That soul tends to linger and follow him around for the rest of time. Typically he does so right after they’ve been killed and we’ve learned he can die too, but a soul he previously saved must end their own life to save his. Pretty deep. This entire series opened with the hook that Rasputin’s best friends were aiming to kill him. It’s not until this issue he confronts them and we find out how he made it out alive.

Why does this comic book matter?

Riley Rossmo is a spectacular artist who has a way of making spectators seem real, magic something you can hold and mysticism something we should believe in. He’s infused this series with a sense of cinematic glee with wide panels and dramatic tensions. Much of these issues go without words to carry you along and he’s still capable of keeping your attention.


Man on a mission.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

Writer Alex Grecian has weaved a mystical tale into a believable world where Rasputin is more than what the history books say he was. This issue bounces back and forth between a fairy tale-like story and the current revenge Rasputin must take to make things right with his “friends”.

The fairy tale portion is the strongest aspect of this issue. There’s a major reveal and an explanation of those blue spirits we’ve seen before. To a point. The fairy tale nature of the story grabs you and honest to god belongs in a book you should read to young ones. The myth is tall and the epic nature is engrossing. Ultimately this issue shows us love—and love lost—are the most powerful things in the universe.

Once again the art is very nice and even though it’s low on the panels per page count it does a lot per panel. This is due to it stretching panels to show more than one thing, or to convey the futility of say, a single punch.

It can’t be perfect, can it?

Well, Rasputin’s fight sequence doesn’t do a whole lot besides look good. It ends with a meaningful note, but one wonders if there could be more said in this sequence to give each blow more meaning.


Jack Frost’s daughter is looking mighty magical.

Is It Good?

I simply can’t wait for the next issue. The origin of Rasputin’s powers are revealed and now it’s just a matter of finding out how he gets to America from here. Read this if you’ve loved even a single one of the prior issues.

Rasputin #9 Review
Art is once again flawlessA big reveal is had!The fairy tale nature of the backstory is interesting
The fight sequence could have used something else to give it meaning.
9Overall Score
Reader Rating 1 Vote
9.0