See all reviews of Daredevil (2015) (6)

The All-New and All-Different Daredevil has plenty of new elements that make him fresh, but he still has his killer instinct and whole lack of fear schtick working for him too. I was impressed with the last issue save for the introduction of our new villain, but maybe that’s in part due to writers writing comics for the lengthier trade?

Either way, does #2 improve on that hiccup; is it good?

Daredevil #2 (Marvel Comics)

Last issue showed us a mentor version of Daredevil as he attempted to train a young new hero named Blindspot, whose name stems from the fact that he can make himself invisible. Matt Murdock is no longer a defense lawyer but working for the state as a prosecutor so his day job has changed as well. Meanwhile a new crime lord calling himself Tenfingers has entered NYC and he’s trained a cult of fighters.

Why does this book matter?

I’ve read somewhere the writer of this book used to be a lawyer. That can only mean more riveting courtroom drama coming out of the title! Plus the new look of DD is great, his role as a mentor opens up new possibilities and his slightly less heroic role as prosecutor is interesting too.


Love the design of this layout.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

This is a great issue and it all starts with a juxtaposition sequence as Matt and Tenfingers speak to an audience. Like a scene out of a movie one speech cuts into the other relating the characters but also their message. This helps give Tenfingers a bit more purpose and standing which in turn helps the following scene feel more natural as bad guys infiltrate the police station.

The abrupt introduction of the villain the last issue is improved here as Tenfingers gets some much needed characterization. He also does something that shows his abilities and exhibits an inspired twist in that he’s trying to start a church. I can see Soule is taking this in a religious direction that sets this new gang apart from the many others Daredevil fights.

The majority of the issue is spent building up Daredevil and Blindspot’s relationship as they discuss this new threat and fighting styles. This scenes works because of the solid dialogue but also the great art.

Daredevil is known for showing his abilities in cool and vivid ways and Ron Garney brings a similar coolness to Blindspot’s powers. He’s invisible, but sees in a sort of neon light. When we’re not seeing the cool colorful look of invisibility, Daredevil and Blindspot look great in their black costumes. Instead of casting them nearly all in black though there’s a green shine on their costumes, which makes them pop in a very cool way. I’m at a loss as to why Matt’s day job is using a monotone color palette, maybe to show how boring and drab it can be, but it’s a stylistic choice that separates it from his night job nicely.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Soule ends this comic about as abruptly as the last introducing a new twist from the villain department that comes off as rushed and kind of forced. It’s a cool development that’ll reap an exciting beginning to the next issue, but it comes off as lazy to have a character reference a threat only to have it appear in the next panel.

Is It Good?

Aside from the awkward ending this is turning into my favorite All-New All-Different series. Eye popping art, a unique villain and a new job for Daredevil means fresh, fun stories.

Daredevil #2 Review
The art is fantastic especially the colorVery cool to see Daredevil as a mentorThe bad guy is tied to a religion...nice touch!
That ending is abrupt!
8.5Great
Reader Rating 3 Votes
8.3