See all reviews of Jupiter's Circle 2 (5)

The end is here, and judging by the cover it’s going to be a sad one. Though we are excited for the sequel to Jupiter’s Legacy, it’s going to be sad to see this blast from the past go. Great character development, dialogue, and pacing has made this a true gem each month. Can writer Mark Millar stick the landing? Is it good?

Jupiter’s Circle Vol. 2 #6 (Image Comics)

As is custom with official Image Comics summaries, we don’t get much information:

The team’s adventures lead them down unexpected paths.

Why does this book matter?

Wilfredo Torres doesn’t get enough credit for what he’s accomplished in this book. The style is simple, but so very effective at drawing the reader into the delicate moments these characters face. A single issue may not contain earth-shattering event after event, but it doesn’t need to. The characters interactions and developments are earth-shattering enough!

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

Once again Millar shows us an aspect of superheroes that reflects our reality when viewing their powers and abilities. In this issue he manages to make the perfect hero seem flawed because of his inability to make mistakes. Through captions of the Utopian’s very human wife, we learn she has the perfect life. The Utopian saves millions of people every day but still manages to cook her dinner and give her the perfect orgasm every night. That’s how we open the issue, but soon time moves on and we see that perfect life isn’t so perfect. Millar gets inside her head and it makes a lot of sense. How could you ever feel good about yourself when your husband is just so perfect? It’s an interesting concept and yet another Millar introduces to get the reader thinking.

It’s not all about the Utopian in this issue–though he is the central character–as it’s more of a check-in with key elements that we know affect the Jupiter’s Legacy series. We see where all the heroes are and key villains too, which makes this a nice goodbye to the series. This all leads to a perfect final panel that suggests the future will be bright and perfect, but if you’ve read Jupiter’s Legacy you know it’s anything but.


Perfect life.

Torres once again does a nearly perfect job with this issue. There are plenty of key moments in the characters’ lives on display, but also very emotional ones. Scenes feel genuine no matter their context as you see the Utopian cry, or Dr. Jack Hobbs grin as he perfects the world, or a few characters smoking some marijuana. There’s a strong sense of hope, even in the face of total loss and frustration, which embodies how many of us view the time period of this book. It’s very fitting, and Torres does well to capture that through the characters.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Alright, if nobody is going to say it I will. Check out the image below and note how the characters are standing on the White House. Now look at the panels below that and see how their heads are turned…they aren’t positioned right! The Utopian is looking to his left as he speaks to Brainwave, but he’s on Brainwave’s left. Considering their costumes are rather similar it’s possible the colorist got this wrong, but that’s an oopsie.


Something’s not right here.

Is It Good?

Mark Millar says goodbye to this series not with a bang, but with a promise. A promise that the world can have a perfect superhero in Utopian, but at a price. He reminds us even the superheroes are human.

Jupiter’s Circle Vol. 2 #6 Review
Solid art that's very good at capturing the humanity of the charactersUtopian gets to be the focus, but Millar weaves in everyone as a nice goodbye
Crazy mistake on page 4!
10Fantastic
Reader Rating 1 Vote
10.0