See all reviews of Green Lanterns (28)

The dynamic duo (sorry) of Jessica Cruz and Simon Baz comes to their first story arc conclusion; can Cruz turn her mental state around and help save the day? Is it good?

Green Lanterns #6 (DC Comics)

So what’s it about? The DC summary reads:

“FAMILY DINNER”! The rookie Green Lanterns try to reconcile some of their differences, when Simon Baz makes a terrifying offer to Jessica by inviting her over for dinner with his family. Can the two survive this with the mysterious Guardian tracking the duo?

Okay… so that sounds completely wrong and I think it’s the synopsis for the next issue. This issue actually concludes the attack of the Red Lanterns and wraps up Jessica Cruz’ incredibly painful anxiety as she curls up and cries whilst Simon Baz is being choked out by Atrocitus.

Why does this book matter?

Sam Humphries has written a strong series so far due to the interesting character dynamic of the very new Green Lantern Cruz attempting to make nice with Baz (also pretty new) as they share responsibilities of defending Earth. Their personalities certainly don’t work perfectly together which creates conflict and drama.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

This issue opens up with some lengthy captions getting us inside Baz and Cruz’s heads and hammering home their need for each other; Humphries writes the captions well in this issue which does a lot in establishing the internal struggle both characters are going through. This internal struggle is resolved via these captions which then extends to their victory physically with the Red Lanterns. A proper resolution is had and Humphries effectively spent this and the last 5 issues setting up an impending doom we’ll be looking out for in coming months.

He also does a good job setting up the next arc which will most likely heavily involve Rami, the Rogue Guardian who’s been popping in and out of this series. He’s been holed up with Baz’s family for the entirety, but with the Red Lanterns out of the way we get a key scene that ends this issue that ramps up the implications of what is inside his mysterious box. The very concept is intriguing as it puts the ring bearer element of the Lanterns’ powers on its head.


Stop spitting so much.

The art by Will Conrad and Jack Herbert closes things out effectively with our Lanterns looking effectively heroic and Atrocitus continuing to pull off a demonic look. You’ll also believe these characters need and care for each other when they reflect on their big win due to the well drawn facial expressions. There’s definitely a heavier inking style going on which gives the book a darker tone that suits the opening pages which involve the Red Lanterns winning.

It can’t be perfect can it?

While the opening captions are good, I wasn’t entirely sold Cruz thought her way out of her depression. Much of her wallowing felt like a repeat of what we’ve seen before and nothing was said to definitely feel like she broke new ground as far as her feelings of worthlessness. The message is a strong one that I think readers could relate to, but her ultimate resurgence didn’t feel earned.

Though this is the big climactic issue, it all feels like table setting, which is unfortunate and leaves you wanting more. The villains are defeated, but (avoiding spoilers here) they really aren’t, and their ability to simply run away felt like every other cliched bad guy getaway. Humphries certainly sets things up and is building something good here, but this issue didn’t deliver enough impactful moments (that were earned anyway!) leaving it less a climax and more a wrap up.


Flower power!

Is It Good?

Green Lanterns #6 sets up the next big arc, closes things out for our heroes, and opens with well written captions that’ll put you right inside their heads. Like much of this series, its strength is when we’re right there with the heroes reading their thoughts.

Green Lanterns #6 Review
Strong captions open the issue and get you right inside the characters headsArt does well with the characters and their emotions
Cruz turns things around and it doesn't feel earnedClimactic issue is anticlimactic
5Average
Reader Rating 4 Votes
8.0