See all reviews of Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye (11)

DC’s Young Animal line continues this week and many people have an eye on it (pun intended). Gerard Way and Jon Rivera write a reboot of sorts for a Cave Carson comeback with art by Michael Avon Oeming. All creators considered, this has the potential to be a lot of fun as it ties itself into the superhero world of the DCU. Is it good?

Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye #1 (DC Comics)


So what’s it about? Check out the DC summary and preview we posted!

Why does this book matter?

Michael Avon Oeming has a great eye for the weird and creating world that feel entirely new. Just look at his work on The Victories. The Young Animal line has shown incredible promise for those who enjoy alternate storylines that aren’t just fight books.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


I want a super eye.

Oeming does a fantastic job on this issue infusing it with touches of super herodom, graphic and disturbing images, and a neat way of showing off the cybernetic eye. Many of the pages have a cohesive theme that tethers the panels together. In one for example, there are panels of Cave talking to a mechanic with a panel of his eye at the center and a mesmerizing circular pattern behind it all. In another, a stark black is used to make a diner and the characters appear vulnerable which leads to a man in silhouette watching them. The color adds to the inventive layouts too, making everything pop nicely.

As first issues go, there’s an effective amount of introductions as well as a solemn tone that gives the character and his story a melancholy feel. This element is enhanced by the colorful and wild art juxtaposing in an intriguing way. You get the sense that Cave is a man in need of a break, but who isn’t necessarily ready to jump back into being a hero. The writing team has the character wander about a bit, introducing key characters that will be in play as the story progresses, but also the wonderfully amazing world he used to be very close to.

The story also ties nicely into the DC universe giving Cave an outsider feel though he used to be part of it all. There are a few cameos and some dialogue referring to the bigger universe and it helps remind us Cave isn’t just some schmoe with a super eye.

Tom Scioli writes and draws two short backups for the issue which are quite unique. The art style looks as if it were drawn on old paper and his Wonder Twins story introduces the characters while offering a throwback sort of feel. The second story runs only one page and tells a story about Joketroopers and it’s wonderfully paced with many panels used to convey movement.

It can’t be perfect can it?

The story of Cave Carson feels as though it’s wandering too much without much of a direction. The character has reason to talk to and meet with characters, but the plot feels as though it’s biding its time for things to actually kick into gear. We’ll see where the story goes from here, but as far as first issues I wasn’t aware who Cave was just yet.


Just a normal family right?

Is It Good?

The world of Cave Carson is wonderfully weird and well worth a look. The art is what sold me as it pops with color and feels incredibly inventive. The issue contains a fantastic throwback story too.

Cave Carson Has a Cybernetic Eye #1 Review
Eye catching and fantastic artCave and his place in the DCU is well definedGreat backup!
I never felt like I knew who Cave was, nor where he was going
8Good
Reader Rating 1 Vote
9.7