See all reviews of Frostbite (6)

Frostbite is the scariest comic on the stands today, but not for jump scares or monsters. No, instead it’s the concept of the very real threat of global warming. The second Ice Age has come and this story takes place 57 years into it so those who can remember when the temperatures were normal are few. Is it good?

Frostbite #2 (Vertigo Comics)


So what’s it about? The Vertigo summary reads:

The start of their journey did not go exactly as planned, but Keaton made a deal to get Vic to Alcatraz safely, and nothing will dissuade her from carrying out her contract. With their main transport knocked out, and roving gangs looking to block their path, Keaton and crew are going to have to get clever if they’re going to stay alive.

Why does this book matter?

Writer Joshua Williamson has created a vividly real world that’s easy to drop in on and experience. The protagonist has a complicated back story and, though she’s doing it for a job, can potentially save the world. Frostbite is a disease that turns people into ice from the inside and they’re on a quest to potentially find the cure.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


Feeling guilty Keaton?

The best elements of this issue reveal what the world is like, particularly in Los Angeles where most of the rich people fled in the early days of the cold creeping in. The surfer dude persona is now some kind of ideal, or at least the uniform of those who work at a Heat Shop. The story gets colder from there (heh) and much more dangerous. A key detail of the protagonist is revealed followed by further information about Frostbite, which ramps up the story and increases the need to get Vic to safety.

The art by Jason Shawn Alexander continues to be photographic in detail when it comes to faces and clothing. There’s a nice texture in background and Keaton looks so real (with great facial expressions) you’ll find it hard to believe this isn’t a moving picture. The action is brutal too, with blood splatters and flying knives looking quite dramatic. In one panel for instance, Keaton throws a knife that’s colored white to increase its stark contrast of the black background and the character who has been stabbed. The vehicles are also quite cool and detailed. Alexander gives them a futuristic feel, but also functional.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Though incredibly badass, Williamson has Keaton cut through an immediate threat so easily it plays to show violence but no real challenge. The scene is brief giving the script a bit of action, but doesn’t entirely feel necessary. Keaton herself seems to run with overt emotions and there’s little character work done here aside from a memory to open the issue.


The rich are the worst.

Is It Good?

Gritty science fiction storytelling that’s incredible real. It’s well worth a look if you like a thought provoking story with a strong premise.

Frostbite #2 Review
Strong use of art to make this feel realistic with strong charactersKey info is revealed about the world and Frostbite
Not much character work with an action scene that doesn't seem very needed
9Great
Reader Rating 3 Votes
4.2