See all reviews of Suicide Squad (2016) (14)

DC Comics couldn’t have had a better first four issues of this series as it not only offered up a cool mission for the characters, but also introduced a new one. Each issue contains a backup story that delves into each character specifically too, which means you not only get the big action in the main story, but character development as well. We check out the latest issue, out this week. Is it good?

Suicide Squad #5 (DC Comics)


So what’s it about? The DC summary reads:

“THE BLACK VAULT” part five! Amanda Waller needs Kryptonite, and only Lex Luthor has it! But for the Metropolis mastermind, a deal like this won’t be cheap—or easy. It’s a war on two fronts as Waller leads a smoldering charm offensive in the Lexcorp penthouse while the Suicide Squad attacks the most heavily guarded subbasement on the entire planet.

Why does this book matter?

Jim Lee hasn’t disappointed, Rob Williams is doing a great job with the main story and the backup and the story feel high stakes and important. Really you can’t lose with this series.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


War is Hell.

Williams opens this issue with a reminder of J. Robert Oppenheimer’s words of fear of the power of the atomic bomb and the potential for end of world scenarios and this does well to remind us how powerful of a threat the Suicide Squad has just given Amanda Waller. This power, which is Zod, hangs over the characters and the reader throughout the issue which helps ramp up the drama in an issue that’s light on action. Narratively speaking this issue allows the reader to take a breath and slow things down, focusing on the fallout of what the characters have done, but also key into character too. The power of Zod though is always there.

The main narrative is fantastically complete, with interesting scenes for Killer Croc and Harley which will pay dividends later. You’ll be shocked to find out it’s all been a slow boil to a wildly surprising cliffhanger that, if you read it over again, shows there’s more to what’s going on.

Jim Lee draws another good issue, this time with some fantastic Killer Croc scenes, and Harley continues to be the fun spark that adds the much needed levity. There’s plenty to enjoy, like the quick but efficient throw down by Harley, or the wonderfully disturbing painting by Enchantress. Artists like Lee, when they’re firing on cylinders, allows the reader to linger and pay close attention to detail which enriches the experience making every page more meaningful.

The backup focuses on the new member of the team known as Hack. It reveals her backstory well while not revealing too much either. It’s another sequence where Waller is asking her questions and figuring her out, and the art by Stephen Byrne works too. He gives her a cool techno digital look when she’s manifested in the internet and you get a sense of how far you can take this character.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Hack’s backstory seems almost cliched as she grew up in an African (I think) slum and stumbles onto powers she didn’t know she had. Maybe there’s more to it than we know, but it’s not very surprising or all that interesting either. It’s basic and not quite compelling enough due to it not developing the characters. Instead it comes off as a bit cheap.


Stop being crazy! Oh, that’s what you do isn’t it?

Is It Good?

Suicide Squad continues to be great with good storytelling and top notch art. It should be considered equal to the best of the DC series.

Suicide Squad #5 Review
Once again strong art!Complex story elements and a whopper of a cliffhanger Zod is building to be one hell of a threat
Backup feels cliched or just underbaked
9Great
Reader Rating 1 Vote
10.0