See all reviews of Spider-Woman (8)

A new story arc begins this week and it involves relationship issues…sorta. Spider-Woman already has a difficult enough time between a baby and stopping crime, so it’s only going to get more complicated from here. Is it good?

SPIDER-WOMAN #13 (Marvel Comics)


So what’s it about? For the full Marvel summary just read the preview!

Why does this book matter?

Quickly, name all the superheroes with a baby. Tough right? It makes this character’s situation unique and extra interesting, but then you add in her spunk and Dennis Hopeless’ ability to make her all kinds of fun and you can’t look away.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


How Iceman of this guy eh?

As far as setup issues go, Hopeless does a good job introducing (and reintroducing) characters, creating a sense of mystery, raising the stakes and most importantly keeping the characters honest. Hopeless quickly establishes Spider-Woman’s life is complicated to the point where she’s not thinking about love, but Porcupine aka Roger very much wants their relationship to blossom. Leave it to Hopeless to wrap that delectably dramatic wrinkle up with the Hobgoblin and his goons mucking that up. There’s something afoot though; it’s not all cut and dry, and it’ll be interesting to see how this story moves forward after this issue.

Veronica Fish draws a very good and expressive issue (with great color from Rachelle Rosenberg) with a tight opening action scene that breaks down well. The amount of character in Spider-Woman, from punching a villain to trouncing around in a pink bathrobe, is at times shockingly good. The character is very alive and feels real right down to the smallest of motions. It makes the character that much more vivid and real and helps sell her firecracker personality. Hobgoblin looks great too and it’s unfortunate there isn’t more of the jerk here.

It can’t be perfect can it?

It’s hard to gather the purpose of things in the single issue format which can make it somewhat confusing as to why time is spent reminding us of characters as Hopeless does here. There are three pages that take Spider-Woman out of the city to catch up with friends and their purpose to the plot remains to be seen, especially given the events of the last few pages. All may be revealed, but it sticks out as a strange subplot to a story that all goes together otherwise.


Don’t mess with her dude.

Is It Good?

Scare Tactics opens with a boom, establishing the characters and deeply personal stakes for Spider-Woman well. Spider-Woman’s charm is infectious and you’ll root for her every step of the way.

Spider-Woman #13 Review
Sets up the characters and story well with high emotional stakesSpider-Woman is infectiously fun and interesting
Characters are established that seem miles away from the main story
8.5Great
Reader Rating 5 Votes
7.2
  • Jo

    It makes her Jessica Jones.

    • Seren

      Ahhh but Jessica Jones was actually based on Jessica Drew. Bendis originally wanted to use Spider-Woman for Alias but Marvel wouldn’t let him. So he made up Jessica Jones.

      • Jo

        She was. Which is why giving her a baby makes the idea a wee bit incestuous.

        • Seren

          Maybe. But their circumstances couldn’t be more different (in terms of how it happened etc.)

          • Jo

            In Spider-Woman’s case it seems like editorial mandate.

          • Seren

            It was not actually. It was all the author’s idea.

          • Jo

            When you set up the baby to be from donated sperm, while playing up the identity of the father through the beginning of the series, it feels forced. Editorial or authorial, it makes little difference. It feels like they were specifically putting Jessica Drew into a situation to mimic/supplant Jessica Jones.

            With Ben Urich as one of Drew’s “girl fridays”, recalling the Pulse series, it feels even more so.

          • Russ Dobler

            Hopeless was a new father when he took on Spider-Woman and wanted to express what he was feeling. Sometimes writers feel different things than you, and that’s okay. 😛