EIR is a new one-shot comic, currently being crowdfunded on Kickstarter. It follows the adventures of a girl named Sasha, who wakes up one morning to find a magical talking helmet that gives her powers and the ability to travel to different worlds. It’s a book that’s deeper than it first appears. Is it good?

EIR


The story starts off like I mentioned above. As soon as she wakes up, young Sasha finds a purple Roman centurion helmet that can talk and has magical power. After trying on the helmet, she soon finds she can move things with her mind and fly. She names it “EIR” after a character in a book she recently read. Eir promises her that “they would have fun today,” and off they go to an alien world.

Sasha and Eir end up in quite a few alien locations and fight off and escape from lots of strange creatures. However, if you think this is just typical hero-fantasy stuff, you’d be wrong. The ending of the book (which I won’t spoil here) certainly casts the rest of the book in a different light. I would imagine it’d benefit most readers to give the book a second read through as there are quite a few hints left by writer Ryan K. Lindsay and situations that have more or a at least a different meaning when you know where the story is going.

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I think Lindsay did a good job with the character of Sasha. It’s great to see a female voice in a role like this. There is a scene showing her unwillingness to harm anyone/anything with her new powers, even when they trying to hurt her. You can see the uncertainty of the character, and it makes her feel more genuine. She’s an adolescent that has to deal with an adult situation in her non-heroic, everyday life. You can see her coming to terms with it as she flies around the Cosmos and slowly coming to a decision about how to deal with it and what kind of person she will be.

The art by Alfie Gallagher is decent, with the cover really standing out. He gets to try his hand at lots of different types of aliens and they’re all unique. However some of the frames with normal people, like Sasha out of her Eir armor and her parents, look a little off. Her eyes tend to bug out too much, and most of the people’s heads have a potato-like quality to them. Colorist Triona Farrell makes the frames pop with bright colors, like Eir’s pink/purplish armor and the giant blue water alien near the end. They really give the book its unique look.

I should also mention that because this is a Kickstarter comic, you’re not going to find it in your comic store. It’s digital download only, since the creators are from Australia and shipping on a print copy would be too expensive. This way, the book is only a dollar. There are also some good perks for larger donations, like a few proof-of-concept print copies, signed and inked EIR panels and even a chance to have Gallagher and Farrell draw and ink a cover for your own comic. If you are interested in reading it, Kickstarter is the only way for now.

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Is it Good?

It’s not your typical comic, both in how you buy it and in the overall story it tells. I thought the premise as a whole was well executed and you’ll definitely form your own opinion of the entire comic after you read the conclusion. It’s an original way to deal with the specific topic at the ending. But I think the greater theme it presents, that of a person using fantasy to escape their worries for a few moments and figure out how they’re going to move forward, is relevant to everyone.

You can still back this Kickstarter today!

EIR Review
Deals with a mature topic, but is suitable for most any age readerWell written female lead characteronly $1 for a unique, well-written book
Some of the facial reactions of the character, especially Sasha's eyesYou may find the story a bit disjointed as it hops around quickly, until you get to the end and put it all together.
8Good
Reader Rating 1 Vote
8.8