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Part 3 of Sitting in a Tree (aka why Miles Morales might be the luckiest guy in the comic universe) continues, this time with an awkward encounter in Gwen’s home dimension.

Spider-Man #13 (Marvel Comics)

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Observations

  • To be fair, an X-Man really should be less surprised/enamored about the fact that other dimensions exist.
  • Yeah, that is definitely not the Jefferson Davis we know and love.
  • In case you needed a reminder, Spider-Gwen is a total badass.
  • Not really my place to say, but once he started trying to bash Miles’ head in, that was the point where calling this version of Jefferson Davis “dad” got more than a little weird.
  • No matter what dimension you’re in, the police always shoot at spider-people.
  • …except for this one. This one is much worse.
  • When the dimensional portal on your wrist says to “Return to Origin Point,” you listen…and take your new friend (maybe girlfriend) with you.

The Verdict

As a comic book reviewer in the post Civil War II world, I’m currently supposed to be ranting and raving about how bad crossovers are. Fortunately, The Clone Conspiracy and “Sitting in a Tree” have been so good that I really can’t go there right now.

In this issue’s case, we get a great dichotomy between Miles, who is still fairly young and inexperienced, and Gwen, who is both a little older and much wiser. She may not have been superheroing as long as him (I’m honestly not sure how the timelines work on that), but she’s able to process and compartmentalize things in a way that Miles is still learning to master.

Of course, to be fair, Miles did get into a giant brawl with a possibly alternate super villain version of his father. That’s bound to mess anybody up.

Speaking of the aforementioned fight, Sara Pichelli draws the heck out of it. You’re not going to find many people who can portray such a wide array of athletic moves and physical impacts.

Script-wise, I wasn’t sure I was going to like the way Bendis started things off via Miles retelling the events to his friends, but now I love it. The narrative is framed in such a way that feels incredibly personal while also giving us a more coherent perspective than we would’ve had in the heat of the moment. The dialogue occasionally becomes redundant/annoying, but Bendis even uses those moments to his advantage to make the characters’ interaction feel more authentic (and seriously, we all have a friend like Ganke who can’t shut up and let someone just tell a story).

As expected, there’s plenty of humor and romantic tension, as well. Still no kiss, but we know it’s coming. Considering how great these two are together already, it should make the moment even better once it arrives. I’m not in any hurry to get there, though—especially when every step of the journey is this enjoyable.

Spider-Man #13 Review
We see a great dichotomy between Miles, who is still fairly young and inexperienced, and Gwen, who is both a little older and much wiser. You’re not going to find many artists who can deftly portray such a wide range of athletic moves and physical impacts like Sara Pichelli.The narrative is framed in such a way that feels incredibly personal while also giving us a more coherent perspective than we would’ve had in the heat of the moment.
The dialogue occasionally becomes redundant/annoying, but Bendis even uses those moments to his advantage to make the characters’ interaction feel more authentic.
9Great
Reader Rating 4 Votes
7.3