See all reviews of The Prowler (5)

Dying and getting resurrected by a megalomaniac clone of your boss is hard enough on its own. Now Hobie Brown is having to deal with the potential end of the world AND some of his old enemies looking to get few revenge licks in while they can.

The Prowler #5 (Marvel Comics)

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Observations

  • Hobie needs to work on his inner monologue pep talks.
  • No matter what happens, we got to see The Prowler kick The Tarantula in the face.
  • Pretty cool getting to watch Jean DeWolfe kick ass again.
  • Curse you, Fancy Dan!
  • “…I’m having a tough time wrapping my head around this.”
  • Me too, Hobie, Me too.

The Verdict

Maybe it’s my bias/adoration for the character, but Jamal Campbell draws one of the best Spider-Gwens I’ve ever seen. He also does a great job with Jean DeWolfe, giving her just the right amount of pain and grit as she pushes through her own mortality to help the people around her.

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Story-wise, The Prowler #5 is a little hard to get a handle on. Sean Ryan deserves a lot of credit for taking the odd way Hobie’s recent history was resolved in the main Clone Conspiracy title and crafting a solid narrative out of it. Unfortunately, there’s a jarring gap in quality between Hobie’s inner monologue (which often feels forced and clichéd) and dialogue between the characters (which is always great).

All that being said, I think this creative team has proven itself enough to keep this title on the pull list. It will be interesting to see what they do with this character after his pseudo reset, but it’s likely to be something worth reading—and guaranteed to always look beautiful.

The Prowler #5 Review
As always, Jamal Campbell's art is superb--particularly how he draws Spider-Gwen.Sean Ryan deserves a lot of credit for taking the odd way Hobie’s recent history was resolved in the main Clone Conspiracy title and crafting a solid narrative out of it.
Unfortunately, there’s a jarring gap in quality between Hobie’s inner monologue (which often feels forced and clichéd) and dialogue between the characters (which is always great).
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