See all reviews of The Unworthy Thor (5)

Thor has been without his hammer since the “Original Sin” storyline back in 2014, but lo, he’s inches from wielding a hammer anew. It’s not the Mjolnir he knew, but the hammer from the Ultimate universe. Does it matter–can a Thor really split hairs over the type of hammer? We find out today, but is it good?

The Unworthy Thor #5 (Marvel Comics)


So what’s it about? Read the preview!

Why does this book matter?

Writer Jason Aaron has kept this series (and really everything he writes) interesting all the way through. He seems to understand readers want plot progression and new ideas as much as possible. This issue delivers there, but really the reason you’ll be talking about this at all is because we finally learn what Nick Fury whispered in his ear three years ago!

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


We want you back Nick!

This isn’t just one, but more like three conclusions and climaxes to enjoy as the story arc ends. Odinson takes on the Collector and Thanos’ minions as they fight over the new hammer, a key scene with Thanos reveals who the cloaked person among his underlings is, and finally Odinson reveals what Nick Fury said to him all those years ago. This all adds up to a lot of answers complete with some vicious fighting. The real boon of the issue though, is Odinson tackling the name he has claimed he can’t be called. Aaron does a good job forcing Odinson to mull over the name Thor and whether or not he deserves the moniker. Given the title of this book, that’s a rather fitting topic to tackle and by the end I think most will agree with the way it turns out.

Considering how much buildup there’s been to what Nick Fury whispered in Thor’s ear that made him incapable of lifting the hammer I’d say Aaron delivers a satisfactory reveal here. The meaning behind the words runs deep and connects well to the godlike (and the mostly arrogant) Thor and his ilk.

Artists Olivier Coipel, Kim Jacinto and Pascal Alixe team up on this one with colorists Mat Lopes and Jay David Ramos who all bring their A game. Among the beautiful pages is a fantastic double page spread detailing the many versions of Thor that’s popped up during Jason Aaron’s time hopping run, which helps remind the reader how far Thor has come. The current state of Thor–short hair, sullen–is rendered very well so as to capture his “man on the razor’s edge” vibe. The use of the darkness of space, in all its white-specked glory, helps convey the emptiness of the scenes throughout the book too.


Hell yeah you are!

It can’t be perfect can it?

Ultimately this story arc was always about Thor wrestling with himself and his demons, but his battle with Thanos’ goons and the Collector leaves one wanting. After the buildup of the last issue I was expecting a bit more of a fight, which is more of a shrug here. Those same goons end up in a battle later which isn’t all that interesting either. The fighting is reduced to a page which is visually flat and ends up being over before it even started.

It happens all the time, but wow is that cover misleading.

Is It Good?

Save for some lackluster battling, this is a fine conclusion that’s filled with answers and a new beginning too. You’ll be talking about this one, and rightfully so–The Unworthy Thor deepens Thor’s backstory and makes the character more intriguing than ever.

The Unworthy Thor #5
Is It Good?
A solid ending with good answers, new beginnings, and a character fulfilled by its end.
Excellent reveals including what Nick Fury whispered in Thor's ear!
Art is gorgeous, especially the double page layouts and spreads
Interesting epilogue reveals a new mysterious character
The fighting is flat, quick, and unsatisfying
The cover is very misleading
8.5
Great
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