See all reviews of Royals (2)

The former Inhuman royal family continues their trek through the stars, determined to find out who they are and what they can be. Is the journey a meaningful one? Is this issue good?

Royals #2
Writer: Al Ewing
Artist: Jonboy Meyers, Thony Silas
Publisher: Marvel Comics


This issue, like the one before it, begins with a scene set five thousand years in the future. We follow a man referred to as “the last Inhuman” as he watches over crowds of brightly colored beings whose origins are still unclear. They are referred to in this issue as both ghosts and projections; whatever the case may be, they are beautifully designed. Artists Jonboy Meyers and Thony Silas deliver a lot of good work in this issue, and the opening scene is among the best highlights. Colorists Ryan Kinnaird and Jim Charlampidis continue to deliver work that is a perfect fit for the book as well. Altogether, the art team create an imaginative and engaging aesthetic for this burgeoning sci-fi saga. Writer Al Ewing also assists in making the first scenes striking. He uses captions more liberally than a lot of contemporary comic writers, and he does so to great effect. Ewing’s descriptions of the last Inhuman’s actions border on purple prose, but they are more than charming enough to sell the dramatic flair effectively.

The issue hits its main snag once events shift back to the present day. The royals go up against a Chitauri swarm and the resultant battle is a tad disappointing. We get a lot of super quick half-explanations of some of the royal family’s battle tech, and then the battle proper begins. My main qualm with the battle is that it feels like we barely see any of it. The royals are up against a whole swarm, and yet the whole battle takes only half an issue. We see Crystal and Flint (especially Flint) use their powers in new ways that should feel really fresh and interesting, but the execution is just too rushed for the concepts to feel adequately utilized. With that said, a lot of the page compositions in this section are fantastic. The art team continues to make good choices; I just wish they’d been allowed more page-time for these events. A Chitauri swarm attacking makes me expect badass star-fights, and this issue’s action could have used more pizzazz.

On the positive side of things, Medusa continues to be a likable lead. The issue’s different characters all bounce off of each other really well; the creative team did a good job in constructing the series’ core cast. However, there are some moments here and there where the line-art drops in quality a bit. Certain characters don’t always look like themselves. For example, in one panel, Marvel Boy could easily be mistaken for Quicksilver if the reader didn’t already know better.

Ultimately, this is a good issue. Its occasional artistic fumbles are largely made up by great art in others parts of the issue, and Ewing continues to do a great job writing Medusa and the captions for the future scenes. On the other hand, the battle scene is very rushed, and as a result feels quite disappointing. The pacing problems hinder this issue from being as good as the series’ debut, but that was a very high bar to try and meet. It may not live up to last issue, but Royals #2 is nonetheless a good time.

Royals #2
Is it good?
Royals #2 isn't as great as #1, but it's still good. Some pacing issues hinder an otherwise fun time.
Ewing’s purple prose captions are delightful
Some very cool usage of two-page spreads
The cast continues to interact in interesting ways
The finer details of the characters’ faces aren’t always very consistent
What could have been a badass space battle feels extremely rushed
8
Good
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  • Jason A. Martin

    I found the art to be a MAJOR letdown from issue #1, and was not surprised to see that someone else finished Jonboys layouts. This series has a lot of potential, but if they expect monthly releases, requiring Jonboy to get help on art, I doubt it’ll last past six issues.