The weirdness of demi students coping with their abilities continues this week with a focus on the girl who can take off her head. Plus, the teacher has a crisis in regards to giving the demi students too much attention!

Interviews with Monster Girls Vol. 4
Creator: Petos
Publisher: Kodansha Comics


So what’s it about?

The official summary reads:

OUT IN THE COLD As high school Biology teacher Tetsuo Takahashi has gotten to know each of his demi students (and succubus colleague), he’s realizing more and more how many unique challenges these girls face. How can a vampire get ready in the morning if she can’t see herself in a mirror? Do dullahans hold the secrets to quantum physics? Testuo learns something surprising every day, but he has a huge challenge ahead of him: with summer coming, he wants to make sure the vampire Hikari and snow-woman Yuki get to join in the sunny adventures. With new problems arising, Tetsuo also starts to wonder if his help is keeping the girls from growing on their own. Can he strike the right balance with the demis before summer break?

Why does this book matter?

Not only is this an anime now, but it’s also quite unique with an innocent sort of story that also contains a strong message. If you’ve ever felt awkward or like an outsider, this series captures that well. Overall this series has been highly enjoyable, with high scores given here for vol. 1, vol. 2, and vol. 3.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


Interesting ideas in this volume.

This volume opens with a short chapter concerning vampires being able to see themselves in mirrors. It’s a quick take that does well to capture the misconceptions we might have with demi people due to movies and pop culture. It’s also a nice start as it highlights the high energy weirdness of Hikari.

The manga’s meaty stories focus on biology teacher Tetsuo in two very different ways. The first has him taking his dullahan student Kyoko to see his college buddy who is also a professor. This story should be a fan favorite in particular because it breaks down how a dullahan can take off their head and maybe even how it works. It’s an interesting explanation to say the least and it even brings in some logical science ideas. The second story involves Tetsuo being told by the vice principal he needs to pay equal attention to demi and human students alike. This story brings up a good point; it is a tad odd he spends so much time with them, but also comes with a surprise lesson. Petos uses this to delve into the point of view of some of the human students and its message is one everyone should read. Basically put, we should try to understand other people’s differences rather than ignore them.

To wrap things up, the volume ends with a bonus chapter based on a winning entry from a contest. I was a big fan of this bonus chapter because it brings in a whole new demi and even brings focus to the somewhat intimate nature Tetsuo has with students.


Fun to see how the world is like ours and they can tackle misconceptions about supernatural beings like vampires.

It can’t be perfect can it?

The awkward nature of the adult teacher and the attraction the students have with him continues! There’s yet another awkward moment in this volume, this time with the vampire demi bending over and showing her panties to her professor and the teacher wanting to grab her. Maybe I’m reading it a bit wrong, but it’s still all kinds of awkward how Petos puts these characters in somewhat ambiguous positions which refer to the sexual tension between the characters.

Is It Good?

This is the most wholesome volume of the series so far. It not only captures the necessity of Tetsuo studying the demi students, but it makes a strong point about how important it is for everyone to understand differences. There’s also a strong case made for the healthy bond the teacher has crafted with the students, which certainly quells my main gripe with this series.

Interviews with Monster Girls Vol. 4
Is it Good?
One of the strongest volumes in regards to the healthy message of understanding other people's differences.
A nice focus on the teacher in varying situations
Interesting explanation for how a dullahan works
A strong message is made about understanding other people's differences
That awkwardness of an adult teacher having weird sexual tension with underage girls
9
Great