See all reviews of The X-Files (2016) (18)

Skinner continues to confront his past in the Vietnam War and his platoon’s choice in jewelry.

The X-Files #13
Writer: Joe Harris
Artist: Andrew Currie
Publisher: IDW Publishing


First Read Reactions

  • 1970’s Court Martial Strategy Tips: Make a big deal out of the fact that the defendant had occasionally smoked the marijuana. Then you don’t have to argue a case anymore!
  • Good lord. These guys really need to stop throwing shade at each other about that amulet.
  • Someone should tell Skinner that guns don’t work on ancient demons (and should definitely not be used on his beautiful bald head).
  • Sorry, but I’m pretty sure Scully has seen more than a few weird amulets in her time at the FBI.
  • Wow. Skinner hasn’t aged much since 1981…
  • …or 1992.
  • Uh, can someone please tell me what’s going on?
  • I swear if a Care Bear comes out and starts giving a speech about the power of forgiveness…
  • …okay that may have been even worse.

The Verdict

Yikes.

What could have (and maybe should have) been a fascinating trip into Skinner’s past turned in a standard, trope-laden tale about soldiers’ sins past. The supernatural element looked really cool thanks to Andrew Currie’s pencils, but it ended up being little more than a toothless metaphor for guilt and making peace with hard choices. There’s also the classic curse passed down from person to person in a group involved with some type of immoral act—along with Skinner brooding about doing the right thing in the face of resulting consequences.

If all of that sounds like pretty standard stuff, you have no idea how right you are. It’s hard to believe that a story involving an ancient demon and the Vietnam War could be boring, derivative, and predictable, but X-Files #13 somehow manages to pull it off. Let’s hope the next story arc gets us back to the great story telling this title was known for before the reboot.

The X-Files #13
Is it good?
What could have (and maybe should have) been a fascinating trip into Skinner’s past turned in a standard, trope-laden tale about soldiers’ sins past.
Artist Andrew Currie provides some incredible visuals of the book's supernatural threat.
Unfortunately, that same element ends up being little more than a toothless metaphor for guilt and making peace with hard choices.
The story is predictable, derivative, and not nearly as exciting or interesting as I'd hoped.
3
Meh