See all reviews of Generations (1)

The team up you never saw coming is here this week in the form of Hulk and Hulk! Amadeus Cho has been a great Hulk due to Greg Pak’s phenomenal writing, but can he write two Hulks in one issue?

So what’s it about?

Check out our preview.

Why does this matter?

Matteo Buffagni draws this issue and he brings a gritty style that’s perfect for two Hulks to go at it in the desert. On top of that, Pak appears to be writing in a revelation for Cho, which may have big consequences going forward.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


Hmm, how did he get here?

I wasn’t sure what to expect with this issue but was pleasantly surprised to find action, compelling dialogue, and an ending that left me wanting more. Pak opens the issue with a bit of confusion (Cho has no idea how he got to the past…at least I think it’s the past) and that leads naturally to some hero fighting hero stuff. Once things calm down–and Cho depowers–Bruce Banner is in shock that someone can actually control the power of the Hulk. And so lies the true heart of this issue, which I won’t go into further so as to not spoil. Let’s just say Cho might be lying to himself about something and only the original Hulk can understand that.

Readers who aren’t familiar with the original Hulk’s backstory should pick this one up as Pak reveals–in a single fabulous page drawn by Buffagni–Banner’s origin. It’s three panels that boil it all down efficiently. There’s also some big monster fighting action as well as Hulk on tank fighting. It’s everything you’d need in a classic Hulk tale!

Buffagni draws a strong issue here that’s great at capturing hard edges and shadows. The trick at showing how big Hulk’s muscles are is via shadows and the angular mass of muscle on these Hulks is impressive. I honestly got Mike Mignola vibes here and there, which particularly came out screaming when a giant monster comes roaring in with a unique and creepy design.


Cue rap track.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Once you shake it out there isn’t a lot to the issue. Does it score fun action points and classic Hulk vibes? Yep. Does it add a whole lot to future stories? Not really. It’s a fun one-shot with a promise of more to come from Cho, but it seems so outside continuity it’s hard to care. There’s also no explanation as to how Cho got into this mess, which seems odd.

Is it good?

Overall I really enjoyed this issue because it hammered home classic Hulk vibes we’ve not seen in quite a while. Hulk is one of the greatest characters and yet one of the simplest. Pak and company show readers it takes a deft hand to accomplish.

Generations: Banner Hulk and The Totally Awesome Hulk #1
Is it good?
A great one-shot story that captures everything good about Hulk.
Captures so much that's good about Hulk like the smashing, monster fighting, and reflection on anger
Solid art that captures the intensity of Hulk
Unclear how Cho got where he is
9
Great

  • james kaveh

    I thought the story was great at first until the big fight around the middle started with the monster.

    Also where in Totally Awesome Hulk is Cho experiencing issues with his transformations? All of the sudden in Generations Hulk he realizes he’s having issues? I thought the start was fantastic but changed dramatically and the interactions between them were boring.

    • David Brooke

      Yeah I’m right there with you on your comment about Cho losing it. Must be foreshadowing for a future issue?