Norman Osborn’s back doing Green Goblin things. Is it good?

Forget Stella getting her groove back–Norman Osborn’s ready to try anything to get his goblin back on!

First Read Observations

  • When things aren’t going his way, Norman’s first instinct is almost always to inject himself with something.
  • Okay, I can’t be the only person who thought the acupuncture scene was actually a massage parlor moment that was about to go in a very…uh, adult direction.
  • “Unconventional” indeed…

  • Sure hope Norman doesn’t trip over Christian Bale on his way up that mountain.
  • Okay, someone please tell me these (supposedly) mystically/spiritually attuned monks aren’t so obtuse that they would train a man as evil as NORMAN FREAKING OSBORN to be a sorcerer.
  • Yeah, I think we all saw this coming.
  • Huh. I actually didn’t see that coming.
  • So…we’re right back where we started?

The Verdict

As telegraphed and and predictable as this story was, it could have been a whole lot worse. Thankfully, a neat twist near the end and some wonderful artwork by Greg Smallwood actually made it somewhat enjoyable. Also, I must admit that the issue’s lone action scene was pretty fun.

I won’t spoil the ending, but when you get there, you’ve gotta ask if the “reveal” really tells us something we didn’t already know.

Look, I realize that superhero comics have to do a lot of recycling, but it doesn’t help when a story presents something the reader assumes to be a foregone as a shocking new dynamic. Perhaps Slott still has some tricks up his sleeve for Norman, but as of right now, it feels like we’re going to down the same green-paved and twisted road we always were.

Amazing Spider-Man #32 Review
Is it good?
Great artwork by Greg Smallwood
Despite the telegraphed and predictable narrative, it's still a fairly enjoyable story.
The first twist actually caught me by surprise...
...but the one on the final page doesn't feel like a "twist" at all--just more of the same.
Superhero comics have to do a lot of recycling, but it doesn't help when a story presents something the reader assumes to be a foregone as a shocking new dynamic
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