See all reviews of Wonder Woman (2016) (22)

Shane Fontana’s “Heart of the Amazon” has felt like one long fill-in to keep Wonder Woman alive through the summer while James Robinson works on this fall’s “Children of the Gods” story. Fontana’s story ends on a strong note, with David Messina back to draw the final issue, but it was still an imperfect story. Wonder Woman had to fight a random evil scientist while learning that being an Amazon is more than just about having super powers. It’s also about fighting for justice and peace.

Here’s the official synopsis for the issue from DC Comics:

“HEART OF THE AMAZON” finale! Wonder Woman may be a warrior, but she’s nobody’s weapon-as the mysterious cabal that’s been trying to manipulate her is about to learn!

“Heart of the Amazon” began with a bombing at Etta Candy’s brother’s wedding, which was revealed to be a ploy by Dr. Shannon Crawford. She wanted to use Diana’s DNA to cure her own illness, and the Amazonian strength and powers that come with it were an added bonus. Diana used the Lasso of Truth to set her Crawford’s DNA back to normal, but Crawford decided she’d rather die than have to suffer. Crawford’s death led to the second half of the story, where Diana learns that a Dr. Hamilton Reverse is also hoping to use her DNA to create a group of supersoldiers. He even hired bounty hunters to capture Diana – dead or alive – to help his project. Despite the danger, Diana gave herself up to Reverse, which is where the action picks up in #30.

Once again, Wonder Woman learns that the only people she can really trust are herself and her friends. Even the Amazonian patrons are useless whenever she faces danger. She has to fight a group of men and women who idolize her, but they only covet her power, not the true heart of the Amazon.

Throughout the Rebirth Wonder Woman era, Diana has repeatedly clashed with people who feel that violence is the only way to save the world. These people want her power, but she’s the only one who realizes the responsibility that comes with being a superhero. This doesn’t make “Heart of the Amazon” a unique story at all though. Diana has been fighting villains like these for decades – in fact, most heroes have faced villains who want their power without understanding the cost.

At least this last part features Messina’s art once again. He’s been on of the highlights of the story, with unique layouts for the action. There’s one page that’s gorgeous, with the action broken up into shattered glass used as panels.

Since Fontana was only on Wonder Woman for this five-issue arc, it’s obvious that she wasn’t given a chance to do something drastic with the character. “Heart” is squeezed in between Greg Rucka’s epic reinvention of Diana and Robinson’s much-ballyhooed introduction of her brother. All that makes “Heart” feel like a stepchild meant to be forgotten.

Is it Good?

“Heart of the Amazon” comes to a strong conclusion, but the story can’t escape the feeling of a rushed fill-in before a real major WW story.

Wonder Woman #30
Is it good?
Fontana writes a strong conclusion for the story, with Diana learning that it's not her powers that make her a hero, but how she uses them.
Great artwork from David Messina again
The story doesn't really surprise at any turn.
The random scientist villain remains dull and uninteresting compared to Wonder Woman's classic villains.
7
Good