Solid writing and good artwork, but the real standout is the coloring.

I’ve tried my luck with horror comics in the past and almost all have always fallen flat easy feat so I entered the pages of Regression with skepticism.

I talk about the art in comics a lot (I know you kinda have to, seeing as it’s a visual medium!) but let me start off by saying the first thing that stood out to me was how colorful the majority of this book is. It’s not full of dark, shadowy art that falls into cliche horror tropes, although it does contain bugs and creepy crawlies designed to give you that ‘not cool’ tingle that runs through you when you see something gross.

The book follows a guy called Adrian who is having a few problems with hallucinating and seeing dead and decomposing people along with, that’s right you’ve guessed it, bugs. These hallucinations get worse and our protagonist finds it more and more difficult to deal with. Enter the title of our series, Adrian tries his hand at some regression therapy which, shock, doesn’t go to plan. So far nothing very original. I’m not gonna lie, I’m glad I got to read this book as a collected volume as I would probably have dropped it after the first issue if I hadn’t of liked the art. As a collection you get to appreciate the writing of the characters and their relationships which go a long way in making you feel the creepiness that’s in the panels of the pages. I felt the frustration, the cynicism, the fear and disgust that the characters felt because of the writing, which was then cemented by the art.

I am looking forward to see what happens next, which by all counts means I enjoyed this title. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not all roses. There’s some sloppy dialogue and a few predictable moments but I can’t expect everything to be high art. Cullen Bunn deserves some acknowledgement for the writing, as does Danny Luckert for the art, but the standout contributor for this title to me is Marie Enger for the great coloring and lettering that makes this book leap out compared to other titles on the shelf.

Regression Vol. 1
Is it good?
Solid writing and good artwork, but the real standout is the coloring.
Good characterizations, pretty to look at, great coloring and lettering
A little cliche at times and occasionally predictable
7.5
Good

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