Batwoman, Cairo, and Professor Pyg make for a rivetting one-shot story.

This week Batwoman gets a new creative team for an exciting one-shot set in Cairo. Can she take out Professor Pyg before she takes out her friend with the aid of writer K. Perkins and artist Scott Godlewski?

So what’s it about?

The official summary reads:

“PYGSTY”! It’s the New Year, and Professor Pyg needs new Dollotrons for his latest artistic endeavor. As Batwoman tries to put her personal demons to bed, she must stop the madman from carving out his sick intentions.

Why does this matter?

Scott Godlewski has impressed me quite a lot over the years, from his work on The Dark & Bloody to The Lost Boys. Given his proclivity to draw horror comics it makes sense he’d take on this one-shot and it’s especially true with a villain as demented as Professor Pyg. This issue also opens up a bit about Batwoman’s childhood which should have fans gobbling it up.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


Sick opening full page spread!

I can’t get over how good a job Godlewski does on this book. The first page opens with a full page splash of Batwoman (see above) and the detail of the glass mixed with the texturing on the boots and suit look fantastic. He then utilizes an interesting four panel structure that makes you read from top down, then top down again. His ability to draw realistic looking people makes scenes like one where Pyg is standing in front of bloody knives all the more disturbing. He draws an incredibly strong looking Batwoman too. Take for instance a scene where she throws a freaking boat motor with one arm. That thing is heavy, but he makes it look so effortless for her.

Perkins writes a solid done in one adventure. Set in Cairo, there’s an air of mystery about the story with Batwoman being a stranger in a strange land. Batwoman’s thoughts are always with her in this adventure and they are there in part to remind us her doubts are the only things holding her back. We get a great scene of her as a child during Halloween that helps show she’s always been a bit insecure and that strengthens her doubts in adulthood. Perkins seems to be saying this is something she’s never conquered and that makes her relatable on a human scale.

Professor Pyg is rendered quite well too. His same old schtick is taking place, but his bits of dialogue make him twisted and scary. While reading this I was reminded of the stories where he’s comical, but that’s not the case here. A welcome thing.


Interesting four panel layout.

It can’t be perfect can it?

Batwoman’s doubts get a bit annoying at certain points of the story, particularly in the big final confrontation. They explain why she’s a bit sloppy when fighting, but it is frustrating when untrained Pyg minions (and Pyg himself) can get the drop on Batwoman in a knife fight. Her captions explain why she’s distracted, but they’re laid on so thick you might just roll your eyes and worry this is less a character tick and more of a chronic issue for Batwoman.

Is It Good?

This is well worth a look thanks to the sharp art alone, but it’s a fine done in one tale too. If you wanted a taste of what Batwoman is about you can jump on here and get a feel for her slightly dark horror tone.

Batwoman #11
Is it good?
A strong issue due to its art and well plotted one-shot story.
The art is hands down a show stopper
A well plotted done in one tale
There's a horror element that's nice
Batwoman's self doubt can get a little obnoxious
8.5
Great