We are all too familiar with the common tale of boy meets girl, boy losses girl, boy regains girl. It’s a tale that has been told since the beginning of time. And I am sure that most of us, including you my wonderful reader, have experienced this in your personal life. But were you unlucky with the results when it came down to winning them back? Dry County, a new book from Image, introduces us to Lou Rossi. Rossi is a cartoonist for the Miami Herald, who meets a lovely lady named Janet. He falls hard for her only for his world to be turned upside down.

Dry County opens with Rossi meandering through a club in the early 90s. Rossi hates the whole scene but is looking for Ms. Right, or perhaps Ms. Right Now. Despising his surroundings, Lou makes his way back to his lonely apartment to watch 120 Minutes. You see kids, MTV used to actually play music and 120 Minutes was a show shown on Sunday nights that played alternative rock music. Hey! The more you know, right? Anyway, Lou gets bored with television and ends up in the laundry room where he meets a gorgeous woman by the name of Janet.

Ahhhhhh, the 90s club scene. A lost art.

The pair hit it right off, even though their clothes become more intimate as they tangle in the dryer. But Lou now has Janet’s number! And instead of waiting out the one-week rule, (we all have been through that one-week thing, eh guys?) he calls her after a couple of days. The plot thickens as Lou learns that Janet has a bit of a past. She ran off with a guy who rescued her from another man who was an abusive and gambling asshole. Oh, and Janet doesn’t love this guy that saved her anymore. Lou, not happy with Janet’s current loveless situation comes clean with his feelings but will where that ultimately lead him?

Rich Tommaso has created two wonderful characters to start out this narrative. Some is from his own personal experience. How do I know? Read the interview I did with him! And his personal experiences add flavor to the tale. We all have been there, and this first issue of Dry County is relatable. I am cheering for Lou Rossi, the lonely cartoonist. The description mentions that Dry County is a crime tale, but Tommaso doesn’t lead us down that path in this issue. But I was okay with that. The focus on Lou and Janet’s relationship, as well as Lou’s personal life, was interesting enough to keep my attention.

120 Minutes, kids! Look it up!

Tommaso has double duty, doing both the art and the story. I dig his artwork as much as I did the story. Lou’s narration is unique. The captions are all written on notebook paper, like he is keeping his own record of what is transpiring. The colors are bright and gives off that Miami vibe with the pastel pinks and blues. Lou and Janet look like your normal every day next door people and gives off a down to earth feeling. These are everyday people we encounter with everyday problems. It’s a classic slice of life story.

I wanted to read Dry County because it promised a crime story and even though that part of the story hasn’t revealed itself, I thoroughly enjoyed the book. The characters are well fleshed out and it’s easy to identify with them. The artwork is gorgeous to look at and overall a fun read. If you are tired of the superheroes you normally pick up on Wednesday, then check out this new every-man superhero Lou Rossi in Dry Country.

Dry County #1
Is it good?
An entertaining beginning to what I hope flourishes into a great crime story.
Entertaining writing and an excellent beginning to the story
Well-developed characters
Artwork is gorgeous and colorful.
Although, not story breaking, no hint of anything sinister about to happen

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