You’ll be convinced Weapon H is worth a chance.

Weapon H is possibly the most 90s thing I’ve seen Marvel do in some time. A Hulk with giant adamantium claws may seem like a dream come true for a 10-year-old, but so far Greg Pak and Fred Van Lente have developed the character well enough that he deserves his own book. At the very least he deserves an ending after “Weapons of Mutant Destruction” gave him a beginning. This issue begins that journey.

So what’s it about?

Read the preview.

Why does this matter?

This is the kind of character that needs to be given the time of day due to the incredible powerset. You can’t just let a super strong adamantium laced character run amok! As was revealed in the Search for Weapon H trade paperback, he also has a family, which appears to be the main element of this series to be explored.

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?


A solid recap page.

The evil corporation Roxxon ends up being the big bad in this issue with ties not only to Weapon H’s family but also to nefarious acts out in the wilderness. It appears if you’re at all connected to Logan (they share the same metal and were tortured in a lab!) you need to wander the forests in the winter. In all seriousness, if you turned into a raging monster you’d run off into the woods too. That’s where the story leads us, to a quick opening which reminds readers why Weapon H can’t be trusted amongst regular folks.

The story is rather well paced, keeping your interest even in slower moments. A lot of time is devoted to Roxxon employees on a secret mission which may sound dull, but Pak keeps your interest due to the dynamics of the team and believable dialogue. As it progresses we witness Weapon H attempt to keep the monster at bay and Pak does enough to show how he’s different from Hulk. He’s a soldier, not a scientist, and also a victim like Wolverine, so there’s less self-loathing and more determination. It all ends with a bombshell cliffhanger that draws your interest into the bigger story at play, which may affect the greater Marvel universe.

Corey Smith draws a strong issue here, never skimping on backgrounds or details in clothing. The credits page early on is a highlight, with speed lines striking behind Weapon H’s victims in dramatic fashion. Surprisingly Weapon H isn’t drawn too often (possibly a con) and appears mostly in presentations via the bad guys. That’s an interesting choice which makes the character more mysterious and makes his appearances more striking.


They don’t stand a chance.

It can’t be perfect can it?

While I was entertained by much of the issue there’s no getting around the fact that a 10-page chunk is devoted to characters we don’t know trying to stay alive in the wilderness. Weapon H does show he’s a good person within these scenes, but it may test your patience. I suspect anyone going in blind will find it hard to care even more so, since they won’t know the family aspect of Weapon H until late in the issue.

Is It Good?

Weapon H shouldn’t work. On paper, he’s just another amalgam of multiple heroes, but there’s no denying Pak is more than capable of crafting a story you’ll care about. It’s still early, but Weapon H is a new hero worth reading.

Weapon H #1
Is it good?
A good first issue that may be a bit slow, but it sets up the character for success.
Well paced -- it'll keep your interest
Some striking art
Builds up the bigger story well
A slower story to be sure
Weapon H doesn't actually smash all that much
8
Good

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