Quicksilver: No Surrender #2 Review



The race for self-realization continues!

There are some things you just can’t outrun. Relationships. Your past. Evil energy monsters that look like you. In Quicksilver:  No Surrender #2, Pietro Maximoff will push his limits and do his best. Is it good?

The Skinny

Quicksilver’s been putting down evil duplicates of himself for what seems like ages, but how can you tell when the rest of the world is frozen in time? Why are the colorful doppelgangers killing people, and why does Pietro personally know all the victims?

The shades run Quicksilver around the world, and through his own history. Turns out the loner has made a lot more connections over a lifetime than you’d think, and he’s even capable of doing so now, in the worst of situations.

The Lowdown

Because in Quicksilver:  No Surrender #2, the mercurial mountebank gets a sidekick, an inanimate, time-frozen turtle friend named Mr. Dibbles! I am not making that up. Spoiler?

I guess when no one will talk to you, you can go a little nutty. Especially when you’re forced to confront all of your life’s moments and mistakes. As his mysterious enemies continue to globally kill, they lead Quicksilver to places and people that jog his memories, including his long-lost daughter Luna (who we find he doesn’t speak to), and his not-father Magneto, who he understandably has mixed feelings about.

The most attention from writer Saladin Ahmed is paid to Pietro’s Romani upbringing. It’s an interesting glimpse into a world not many think about, and a look at a people almost always misunderstood. It’s also a great way to reveal more of Quicksilver’s character — a wanderer forced to stay put, who only wants to run away.

You could always tell that Quicksilver:  No Surrender would be a character study more than anything else, and Ahmed does good work in reminding us what Pietro’s all about. It’s tough to do that when literally no one else talks, which is probably why the turtle came into play at all — it’s something for Quicksilver to talk to, even if it doesn’t talk back.

Despite the turtle technique, there’s still a lot of exposition and explaining in Quicksilver’s internal monologue, an issue carrying over from #1, and part of the blame for that probably still lies with artist Eric Nguyen. His panel proportions and layouts are amazing, just what’s called for in a Quicksilver book, but he seems unwilling or unable to actually depict a fight scene or really any kind of discernible action. A couple images of extended arms don’t count.

As the sinister shades multiply, Rico Renzi’s colors become more important, and he’s brought Chris Brunner along this time to assist. They’re an effective combination, as each brightly-hued adversary appropriately glows, and their extended energy forms seem to crackle.

The Upshot

Quicksilver:  No Surrender #2 is a good second installment of this quiet character piece that will surely satisfy fans of the first issue. The same drawbacks aren’t really alleviated, but the strengths haven’t faded, either. Quicksilver’s inner monologue gets a little repetitive at times (almost unavoidably?), and we still haven’t seen a decent fight sequence, but the artistry in the layouts and the window into Pietro’s psyche are realized enough to keep the story interesting.

Quicksilver: No Surrender #2
Is it good?
It's on par with the first issue, but the repetition and exposition can get a little frustrating. Still a beautiful sight to behold, and a nice look inside Quicksilver's head.
Great panel layouts
Good character study
Beautiful colors
Repetitive monolgue
Exposition where art could have better communicated
8
Good