Snotgirl #11 Review



It’s got #looks. It’s got #laughs. It’s got a #lot of unanswered questions.

Snotgirl is back from hiatus and in #11 Lottie Person wants more from Caroline than uncertainty and casual flirtation. With starting a business, keeping up with her difficult friends, and dealing with her ex on her plate, trying to find stable ground in her relationship with Coolgirl is becoming more than she can handle. Does the Snotgirl team return with follow-worthy content, or should we leave them on read?

Liked, commented, and subscribed. It’s business as usual from team Snotgirl, which means co-creators Bryan Lee O’Malley and Leslie Hung bring all the drama, zingers, and unanswered questions the series is known for to the new issue. The team keeps the tension between Snottie and Caroline palpable as the chemistry between them heats up, but Caroline seems to do everything she can to keep Lottie chasing her like a half-caff, nonfat almond milk, one-pump lavender, cold brew on a stick. She continues to come off as insensitive and unlikable and though her demeanor makes for excellent tension that keeps me on the edge of my seat whenever she and Lottie get close, it’s hard to tell if I’m meant to care about her at all or if she’s just here to further plot and conflict. Speaking of conflict, I love the ways in which O’Malley and Hung included Virgil in this issue, letting him appear and disappear throughout the issue without a ton of emphasis put on his presence.

Leslie Hung’s pencils and inks continue to be some of my favorite in comics. This issue gives Hung the opportunity to try a lot of different looks on Lottie and pairing those panels with the character sketches that always show up at the end of the issue makes for a lot of great Lottie Person #lqqks. Hung is such a strong portrait artist, that no matter how heinous the characters act towards one another, her expressive, striking character renderings keep me engaged. I would argue it’s her gorgeous artwork that maintains the balance the series excels at in keeping the characters relatable or comedic even as they say or think terrible things. Even when Lottie is thinking something that might come off as vain or self-interested, her expression conveys her insecurity clearly, so I end up sympathizing with her rather than rolling my eyes.

Rachael Cohen’s coloring continues to be pitch perfect for the series, leaving the pages dripping in moody pastels and glowing hues that set the tone and elevate the mood. Subtle details like the blush of intoxicated cheeks or the way a character is back-lit by the rising sun are just a couple of examples of the level of detail Cohen brings to the issue. There’s a page where half the space is full of character rendering and lettering instead of panels, but Cohen fills the spaces between the line art with waves of faint color that creates the effect of the character posing in front of a watercolor backdrop. Speaking of the lettering, Maré Odomo’s work matches the style of the line art really well when it comes to handwritten-style fonts. Her bolder fonts are wielded expertly as well, adding a lot of comedy to the aforementioned page.

Overall, Snotgirl #11 brings more of the laughs, drama, and intrigue fans of the series will come to expect. If you’ve been reading the series thus far, you’ll enjoy this issue as much as the others, but if you’re a new reader or haven’t liked the series thus far but are still reading for some reason, this won’t be a must-buy. Once again, an issue goes by with a new question added at the end rather than any answered, but I’ve come to expect this and readers familiar with the series likely won’t be surprised either. Even with nothing answered, this series is still at the top of my pile each month and like a stan waiting for Lottie’s next Insta story update, I can’t wait to see what happens next!

Snotgirl #11
Is it good?
The creative team comes back off hiatus with a strong start to the new arc! Do we get any answers to the plot's many questions? No. Is the issue a gorgeous, hilarious read? Absolutely.
The ebbing and flowing tension between Lottie and Caroline kept me on the edge of my seat.
Leslie Hung’s pencils and inks continue to stun, resulting in gorgeous renderings that also balance the characters comedy with their unlikability.
Rachael Cohen’s coloring is emotive, detailed, and elevates the mood of the issue.
Maré Odomo’s lettering matches the style of the issue well and adds a lot to the comedy.
Caroline continues to be insensitive and unlikeable, making it hard to really care about her on her own even if she adds to the comedy or tension.
Another question is added while the rest continue to go unanswered.
8
Good