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PTSD Radio Vol. 6 Review

One of the strongest volumes in the series yet.

Masaaki Nakayama and Masaaki Nakayama
Price: Check on Amazon

PTSD Radio is by far the creepiest and most creative horror series I’ve ever read. Told in vignettes, each volume contains many short horror tales with a few longer stories too. Added to this is an ongoing story about a totem that curses folks and chokes them with hair. In the sixth volume released by Kodansha Comics at the end of January, we learn more about the totem and get a heavy dose of scary thrills along the way too.

So what’s it about?

The official summary reads:

…wha…..wards…….due…….rious reas……..tcht…shelved…………zrr….zrr…….addition to….more spooky stories….huff…huff…..grrrKRKr………creepy continuation….krk….kreeeeek…kik…the authot’s real horror story saga……..tcht….tzzt…………ything reveal…….teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee………..klik……………don’t……….tell………anyone………………………………..This is AERN-BBC, PTSD Radio.No tuning….necessary.

Why does this matter?

You are guaranteed to get creeped out or even scared by this collection. From phantoms that stare at you as you walk the streets to a face that appears out your window, there are so many creative ways creator Masaaki Nakayama creeps you out.

This is also a great series. Just read our reviews of Volume 1Volume 2Volume 3Volume 4, and Volume 5

Fine, you have my attention. What’s good about it?

A thing of nightmares.
Credit: Kodansha Comics

This volume continues the trend of high quality scares and interesting stories. There are many two or three-page stories that quickly introduce a character and then drop the scare into your lap. There are certainly scares we’ve seen in past volumes (like big heads staring at us through a window way too high for anyone to reach) but the art makes up for it with uniquely creepy visuals. It’s also neat to see how Nakayama weaves in factoids about ancient Japanese culture like a patron deity that lived in every thatched roof. Wrinkles like this give the overall package a bit more value since we’re learning something too.

The biggest takeaway for me with this volume is the rock totem that has appeared since the very first volume. Nakayama reveals new details about what was going on with Japanese culture at the time and this adds a new layer to why it uses hair to kill. It suits the horror genre well too since it’s this ancient thing that nobody ever understood.

There’s a new visual scare that Nakayama uses in this volume that works very well. It involves shadows and objects coming together to make a face. He uses it twice in this volume and in both instances we see something that appears ordinary and then over one or two panels it starts to reveal a face hidden in plain sight. It’s a great idea and it works both times. There are many monsters of a sort that pop up too, with some of his most creative popping up in this volume.

This little horror show gets new details revealed.
Credit: Kodansha Comics

It can’t be perfect, can it?

Some of the stories can feel a bit long although they help keep the pace variable throughout. God knows if it was all two-page horror stories the reader would get too used to the formula.

Is it good?

One of the best volumes yet thanks to new visual scare ideas and a continuation of the rock totem story adding new details. At this point, it’s without a doubt one of the scariest series ever put to paper. Now, can we get a TV show out of this or what?

PTSD Radio Vol. 6
Is it good?
One of the best volumes yet thanks to new visual scare ideas and a continuation of the rock totem story adding new details. At this point, it’s without a doubt one of the scariest series ever put to paper. Now, can we get a TV show out of this or what?
Interesting new visual ideas to give you the frights
Continuation of the rock totem story
Many creative scares
A long-form story or two can drag a bit
10
Fantastic
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