Tokyo Ghoul: re Vol. 6 Review: Dark and twisted fun



A dark and emotional volume with great twists.

Tokyo Ghoul has been of the most well-known contemporary manga since debuting in 2012. The story revolves around college student Ken Kaneki as he tries to readjust to his new life after a vicious attack from a female ghoul transforms him into a part-human, part-ghoul hybrid. The popular franchise includes manga, movies, an anime, and action figures.

Vol. 6 of its spin-off, Tokyo Ghoul: re, brings lots of exciting revelations and action in a relatively short book. One of my favorite things about this manga is the fact the darkness contained within the story is paired with continuous unexpected twists. It is unfortunate that some readers may be turned off to the manga if they don’t enjoy the Tokyo Ghoul anime. With that said, it is still incredibly exciting to see what will later be shown in the show as well.

Despite a disappointing previous season, each volume of the ongoing manga proves that there is nothing wrong with the actual storyline, just some of the production choices for the anime. Within this volume’s chapters, we once again see the evil that is consuming Kaneki attempt to take over Commission of Counter Ghoul (CCG) investigator Haise Sasaki. These are some of the most tense moments in this installment.

Unlike in previous volumes, this time the other members of the CCG are beginning to notice that something is not right with their leader. Vol. 6 features two battles between the CCG and the Aogiri Tree,  a terrorist organization dedicated to ensuring that all ghouls live freely. The CCG is able to come out victorious in both fights, but not without suffering heavy casualties. Despite the CCG’s major victories in battle, it seems certain we will see yet another fight in the next volume. This should all lead up to the climax with the CCG facing off against the Aogiri Tree.

The one thing I love the most about this new direction that Tokyo Ghoul: re has taken is the parallel of Haise and Ken Kaneki to Tyler Durden and the Narrator from Fight Club. Much like Durden, Ken is the devil on Haise’s all too willing shoulder. It is unlikely that Ken will remain unknown to the rest of the CCG for very long, but this remains a nice narrative twist that leaves readers wondering what will happen. As the inner conflict grows within Haise, so does the conflict between the CCG and the ghouls.

There is a unique line in Tokyo Ghoul: re Vol. 6 that explains what is happening in the book: “A tragic life is not living as yourself, a happy life is being able to die as yourself.” The sadness within that quote wraps up the scenes of deaths that happen in this volume very nicely. It’s part of an emotional moment that is bound to bring many readers to tears. There are many manga that are dark and at times almost unbearable to continue reading, but this series not only introduces darkness around the lives of the characters, it also succeeds in making readers feel a multitude of emotions.

Tokyo Ghoul: re Vol. 6
Is it good?
A first-rate volume that succeeds in making readers feel a multitude of emotions with the darkness that surrounds various plot twists.
The conflict between Haise and Ken ensues with a dark twist
There are many revelations that stir up new conflicts
The battles against the Aogori Tree result in a huge reveal
Some parts are made confusing by Haise and Ken's relationship
The battles seem never-ending
We still don't know who the One-Eyed King is
8
Good