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Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds #6 Review

Fresh baguettes!

I love the Doom Patrol. I love how weird they are and that they’re a team of outsiders that come together to fight crime and give each other support. Weight of the Worlds has been a fantastic follow up miniseries to Gerard Way’s Doom Patrol run. I’ve enjoyed every issue of this mini, and I’d say its some of the best Doom Patrol content out there. Issue #6, written by Gerard Way and Jeremy Lambert, art and colors by Omar Francia, and letters by Simon Bowland, is a great issue and follows the trend of the first five. However, it is also one of the weirdest comics I have ever read. Words do not really capture the experience that is this issue, but I can assure you that this comic is a wild ride that continues to challenge what a comic book can be.

The fundamental success of Weight of the Worlds is its unrelenting strangeness and technical skill working beautifully in tandem. While Gerard Way’s main Doom Patrol run was an approachable modern take, this miniseries dives headfirst into bizarre situations equal to and sometimes exceeding Grant Morrison’s Doom Patrol Run. This issue features the Doom Patrol entering a virtual reality space (called the Bozumatriks), and this is visually represented with bizarre computer-generated style art. The immediate comparison I thought of was the ’90s animated TV series “Reboot,” though even that doesn’t fully capture it. The Doom Patrol have entered this space chasing after a frog riding a motor scooter who delivers baguettes in order to force him to drink orange juice. His name is “Wild Ass” and honestly if you haven’t tabbed over to your favorite digital comics vendor and purchased the issue at this point, I don’t know that there’s much else I can do for you. The art here actually really works, and these crazy cyberspace action scenes pop off the page. I know how weird this all sounds, but the vision in incredibly well realized.

Though Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds consistently delivers hilariously strange content, it also doubles down on the team’s core messages of mental health and self-love. While the main team does… whatever it is they’re doing, Robotman is continuing his crusade as Mr. Fixit. Cliff has gone through some very real challenges over the course of this miniseries and he’s currently in the midst of an endless quest of problem solving in exchange for upgrades. There seems to be no end to this as the situations gradually become more absurd. Cliff is clearly hurting, and his struggle with himself and what he can fix is the kind of discussion Doom Patrol does best. Though the scenarios are absurd, it’s this kind of underlying discussion that gives the Doom Patrol such strong purpose.

So many comics are stale, safe, and leave you feeling unsatisfied. They lack vision and feel purposeless. To be completely honest, I don’t always know what Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds is doing. I have not yet found the meaning behind Wild Ass and his baguette throwing, scooter riding, CG shenanigans. What I can say is that every issue of this miniseries has delivered an engaging, unique experience with a core of intense heart. It challenges the medium and has extremely honest discussions. This is the Doom Patrol doing what they do best, and it’s been one of my favorite miniseries of the year. It’s a really special comic, and it’s worth every penny.

Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds #6
Is it good?
Doom Patrol: Weight of the Worlds is silly and bizarre, but it's got so much heart underneath that. This is a special experience that may not work for everyone, but there's just nothing else like it.
Real and honest struggles
Incredibly unique sense of style
Baguette frog!
10
Fantastic
Comments

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